When Your Child Wants To Work In Theatre

When Your Child Wants To Work In Theatre

One of my sons has a flair for the dramatic and I’m sure he’d love to work in theatre. The thought of a nine to five job would send my child to sleep. What about your children? Does he or she dread the idea of sitting at a desk and staring at the computer all day long? There are a lot of people who feel this way. Instead, they want a job offering excitement and a great thrill. The world of theatre definitely provides this. Nonetheless, you will need the correct training if you are to make it in this competitive industry, and therefore selecting one of the best theatre schools is of paramount importance.

Starting early is important. My youngest attended a local drama group class for a year and loved it. It was clear to see that some of those who had been going for a few years already were obviously well suited for work in theatre, or at least that they had the skill and confidence.

Courses Available – First and foremost, you need to take a look at the courses that are available. After all, there is no point going to a theatre school if it does not have the course your child wishes to embark on. Don’t make the mistake many do by simply reading the name of the course. Take a look at the curriculum and what your child will be learning on a yearly basis. All areas should be covered – i.e. acting, singing, and dancing.

Eligibility Criteria – You need to discover what you will need in order to be accepted on the course in question. After all, you will need to see what qualifications your child needs. This impacts the school you send your child too. The best schools, like LeicesterHigh.com, will ensure your child plots out the perfect career path. Nevertheless, it is worth pointing out that a lot of theatre schools accept candidates based on auditions.

Cost – The cost of your course is obviously important, as you will need to make sure it is something you can afford. This point is different for each person. After all, there are those that will be entitled to grants and loans, whereas others may need to fund their theatre course themselves. Furthermore, you should also try and factor in other costs, such as travel.

Level of Experience – It is vital to go for a school that has been set up for a considerable amount of time. In most instances, going for a school that has just been set up is not recommended. After all, how do you know that they are going to provide your child with a worthwhile education when you have nothing to go off?

Tutors Teaching on the Course – Make sure you take a look at the tutors who will be teaching on the course. Do a quick search online to discover their credentials. After all, you want to be sure your child is going to be learning from someone with a lot of experience and a successful history in the industry, especially if the end goal is to work in theatre.

Reputation – Finally, you should read reviews that have been left by those who have already attended the theatre school you are considering. It will be even more beneficial if you can find reviews that have been left by those who have already taken your course. This is the best way to get an honest assessment of the school in question. Nonetheless, consider the reviews as a whole, don’t be blinded by one.

While my son would probably love to work in theatre, he decided to go down another route and therefore we didn’t formalise his training or take it further. If we had though, Roy and I would certainly have had to do our due diligence and ensure that whatever courses, or whatever schools we looked at offered well-rounded study and that they would be places that he would be happy. It’s amazing how opportunities are open for our children these days, enabling them to build skills and even grow careers at a much earlier age than we ever could.

 

Teaching Children About Different Cultures

different cultures

Our world is a rich and diverse one, full of hundreds of different cultures, faiths and belief systems. Childhood is the perfect time to learn more about the wider world. Learning about different countries, cultures and beliefs makes children more accepting and can prove highly beneficial as they move forwards through life. As regular readers will know, I have two children, aged 8 years and 12 years and for us teaching them about diversity forms an important part of our parenting.

Of course, school will play a big part in the development and education of our children, and the experiences they encounter while at school will probably go on to influence the rest of their life. Most school curriculums include variations on subjects such as Religious Studies, Philosophy and Ethics, and Citizenship; often starting with a basic foundation in primary school before giving students the opportunity to learn more at secondary school. My eldest has certainly been enjoying his RS lessons.  As parents  though, it is ultimately our responsibility to to teach diversity, to help them explore different cultures and more.

There are many ways to teach children about different cultures. Here are just a few:

Learn by Example

Young children often like to follow in the footsteps of their parents, mimicking their actions and copying phrases and speech patterns. Most children look up to their parents and want to be like them, which is why one of the best tools available to you is yourself.

Understanding Different Faiths

While younger children might prefer to follow your lead or learn through games and fun activities, older children will most likely be mature enough to start learning by taking in the world around them. Different faiths, cultures and beliefs will start to become more evident, whether it is in school, on social media or simply while out and about.

Religion can be a complex and controversial topic, which is why some people prefer to shy away from it to avoid complications. However, our children need to learn about the world around them, and simple discussions about faith can help youngsters understand why people believe the things they do. It can also help with questions around everyday occurrences like choosing to dress a certain way or eating (or avoiding) a particular type of food. Put simply, if children know the reasons behind these things, they are more likely to be accepting and tolerant.

Travel to Learn About Different Cultures

What better way could there be to learn about different cultures than to see them for yourself? Travelling may be a challenge with young children, but once they get a bit older it can be a brilliant way to open their eyes to the wider world and show them new countries, cultures and sights. This is something we would love to do.

different cultures

Make Learning Fun

Fun activities and exciting games are a perfect way to get children engaged and interested in learning – no matter what it is that you are trying to teach them. There are plenty of games, activity packs and resources available out there, so do a little research and see what you can find.

Whether it is learning about what a zakat calculator can be used for in Islam or trying out different recipes from around the world, there are plenty of creative ways in which you can incorporate learning into daily life.

Above all else, it is important to educate the next generation about the differences between people in our world and help them learn to embrace their uniqueness. Inclusivity and understanding are essential for creating a better, happier future for all, so why not do what you can today to shape a brighter tomorrow.

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