Preventing Teeth Removal

Preventing Teeth Removal

Since 2012, the NHS has spent over £165 million on teeth removal in a hospital environment for patients of all ages. That’s an amazing amount of money!

In 2017, over 42, 000 children were admitted for a general anaesthetic procedure, to extract teeth that were affected by decay. The issue also touches adults. The most common cause of tooth decay, in the UK, is our increasingly high consumption of sugar. Ultimately, with 170 operations a day to remove teeth in patients aged 18 or under, there’s no denying that the UK is going through a dramatic oral health crisis. We all need to ensure that we help our children develop positive habits, both in the bathroom and in the kitchen if we want to help reduce some of these teeth removal operations.tooth removal, teeth, oral hygiene

Mouth Hygiene isn’t Optional

First of all, it’s never too early to introduce a healthy routine. Good oral health is detrimental to your well-being and your lifestyle. Ultimately, we all know what causes tooth decay: sugar. Indeed, sugar feeds the bacteria in your mouth and increases the risk of plaque formation, which is when your teeth can get damaged. Consequently, it’s essential to brush your teeth at least twice a day to make sure that bacteria can’t affect your smile. Floss should be a daily occurrence too as it eliminates the food that might otherwise get stuck between your teeth and lead to plaque formation. 

Too Ashamed to Smile?

Unfortunately, cavities can still happen, especially if you’ve developed bad habits in the past. When plaque bacteria have softened the enamel, a hole can appear. A dentist can help you to identify the best treatment for your problem. In most cases, filling the cavity is sufficient. However, if the root is infected, the treatment could be extensive and require extraction. If this is the case, you need to act quickly. You can cover the extracted area with a veneer solution such as Instasmile, for instance. Tooth or teeth removal is the last resort. Keeping on top of your dental checkup could save your tooth and you money.  

Don’t Wait for the First Tooth

Failure to educate children about the importance of oral hygiene is one of the leading causes of extraction in young patients. Indeed, while sugar can provide a favourable terrain for plaque formation, it could be prevented through tooth brushing. But, you need to introduce a mouth health routine even before your child has their first tooth. Indeed, helping to keep the gums clean in babies and toddlers can prevent gum recession in older years. Gum recession not only exposes the teeth to bacteria but it can also aggravate the impact of tooth decay, leading to tooth loss.

Avoiding Teeth Removal: In Summary

Clearly, we have some serious dental issues here in the UK. Sugar isn’t the only thing that causes problems obviously but it has been identified as a major contributor. Advice states that the best way to deal with this growing issue, especially in terms of avoiding teeth removal is to teach children early about good oral hygiene habits and to help them maintain their new and important routines. This is something we’ve worked really hard on with the boys but there is always more work to do.
On that note, if you have any top tips for boosting children’s tooth/oral care routines let me know by commenting below.

 

Struggling To Conceive

Struggling To Conceive

Our fertility struggles are not something I post about often. I was told it was unlikely I would be able to conceive naturally, and fertility treatments/IVF weren’t necessarily an option (it’s a postcode thing). I did manage, though it took years of trying for both our boys and the journey was not without our disappointments and heartbreaks. Struggling to conceive is a difficult time for both of you and it is ok to be disappointed, hurt and even jealous of others. It is natural. 

Struggling with conception can be a worrying time. It is worth mentioning that it is not uncommon for people to not fall pregnant immediately. We all hear stories about people who conceive in the first month of trying however it is important to remember that this is rare and not considered the norm, especially for those coming off contraceptive pills etc. Your first port of call after a year of trying or if you have worries would be your GP who can refer you to a specialist if they feel it is necessary.

If you, your partner or you both have a fertility issue, there are a range of options you could look at in order to achieve that much-awaited positive pregnancy test. 

Struggling to Conceive? Consider Your Physical Health

Of course, it would be just plain wrong to suggest that living healthily will instantly solve your problems, but sometimes, it can have a big effect, to the point where it’s worth trying. Get more exercise, more sleep, and eat a highly nutritious diet. There might be a chance that with this effort your chances of fertility could rise. However, over-exercise and being underweight has also been associated (but not fully linked) with lower fertility rates, so be sure you’re remaining careful and truly health-focused in your efforts.

Visit A Fertility Clinic

A fertility clinic directory should help you find the best treatment or assessment to help you figure out your next step. Not only will they take into account your physical requirements, but also your emotional and spiritual needs as a couple. They will be able to analyse your personal situation and offer advice based on your individual needs. Speak to your GP about taking this next step, if it is appropriate to you.

Consider Every Option

IVF treatment, adoption, surrogacy and a range of other potential options are all worth considering. Don’t dismiss these options immediately. It might not seem that these are an ideal solution for you but do the research anyway. Who knows where your fertility journey will take you?

Take Care of Each Other

Your physical health when trying to conceive is important, as is your mental health. Struggling to conceive can cause enormous strain. I, for example, always struggled with guilt. I have the fertility issues and therefore always felt bad for being the “problem”.

It’s not always easy for the men on our lives either. Support often seems to be geared more towards the women (in our experience) however if there are two of you struggling to conceive and both wanting to have a child, two of you feel the same disappointments.  Make sure you are there for each other and look at ways to stay mentally healthy as well as physically. Counselling can go a long way towards helping with this aspect of struggling to conceive.

 

Wherever you are on your journey I wish you all the very best. I’ve not got any “off-the-shelf” platitudes because I’m pretty sure you’ve heard them all before. Be kind to yourselves and keep on asking questions and researching your options.

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